Rirkrit Tiravanija: untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed)

ICA London

London, UK

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The Institute of Contemporary Arts is proud to present a newly commissioned permanently sited work by Rirkrit Tiravanija. 

Tiravanija is known for a practice that overturns traditional exhibition formats in favour of social interactions through the sharing of everyday activities such as cooking, eating and reading. Creating environments that reject the primacy of the art object, and instead focus on use value and the bringing of people together through simple acts and environments of communal care, Tiravanija’s work challenges expectations around labour and virtuosity. 

Open to the public and situated within the ICA’s lower bar, untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) comprises a sake bar with communal seating and tables set within a painted sunrise and sunset. Purpose-built for the ICA, the work includes crockery hand-crafted in Tiravanija’s Chiang Mai studio and lighting created in collaboration with artist Rafael Domenech.

untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) marks Tiravanija’s return to the ICA, following his participation in the landmark exhibition Real Time in 1993.

untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) is presented in collaboration with TBA21, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, with special thanks to Francesca Thyssen-Bornemisza.

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Making Social Spaces in Museums: Jori Finkel, Shinique Smith & Rirkrit Tiravanija

Hammer Museum at UCLA

30 May 2019 | 7:30p

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For her new book, It Speaks to Me, journalist Jori Finkel interviewed artists about artworks that inspire them from museums around the world. Two of those artists, Shinique Smith and Rirkrit Tiravanija, join her here to discuss their own history of transforming museum spaces.

Finkel covers art for the New York Times from Los Angeles and is the West Coast correspondent of The Art Newspaper.

Smith is best known for creating socially loaded sculptures out of used clothing and fabrics and recently made a donation center for the homeless part of her exhibition, Shinique Smith: Refuge, at the California African American Museum.

Tiravanija has long made hospitality a part of his art, most famously serving Thai curry and rice to gallery and museum visitors. A related project is included in his new exhibition Rirkrit Tiravanija: (who’s afraid of red, yellow, and green), now on view at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C.

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Artist Rirkrit Tiravanija is serving free curry at his Hirshhorn installation. We asked him to explain why.

Rirkrit Tiravanija | by Sadie Dingfelder | Washington Post

Does contemporary art make you hungry? Then you’re going to love the Hirshhorn’s new exhibit, “Rirkrit Tiravanija: Who’s Afraid of Red, Yellow, and Green.” The installation, which opens Friday, serves up three colors of Thai curry to lunchtime visitors, who can dine while watching area art students sketch images of political protests on the gallery walls. (Visitors can even assist with the drawing if they’d like.)

Tiravanija, a Thai artist who grew up in Thailand, Ethiopia and Canada, is known for including communal elements like dining and group drawings in his installations. Often, he even cooks the food himself, as he did for the original 2010 manifestation of this piece in Bangkok. In the Hirshhorn version, the food will be catered by local restaurant Beau Thai, and visitors can try the curries (while supplies last) Thursdays through Sundays, 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m., through July 24. We talked to Tiravanija to learn what he hopes people take from the piece, besides a full belly.

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RIRKRIT TIRAVANIJA: "THE DIVINE COMEDY" FOR PUBLIC DAY AT FONDATION BEYELER

Rirkrit Tiravanija

Public Day: The Divine Comedy

Fondation Beyeler

Baselstrasse 101, 4125 Basel, Switzerland

Sunday, September 16th, 2018, 12 - 6pm

Rirkrit Tiravanija invites to join a metaphorical journey through a participatory hell. Loosely and abstractly based on Dante's "Commedia".

Sunday, September 16, 12 – 6pm, included in the museum admission.

RIRKRIT TIRAVANIJA

“I AM NOT INTERESTED IN LEAVING THINGS BEHIND, BUT IDEAS.”

Video: Bloomberg, “Brilliant Ideas”