ELEGANT SCIENCE
Nov
17
to Dec 22

ELEGANT SCIENCE

 
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ELEGANT SCIENCE

17 November – 22 December 2018

Opening: Saturday, 17 November  6 - 8 pm

Berenice Abbott

Man Ray

Laszlo Moholy Nagy

Eadweard Muybridge

Trevor Paglen

Thomas Ruff

Thomas Struth

Hiroshi Sugimoto

Kerry Tribe

Christopher Williams

1301PE is pleased to announce Elegant Science, an exhibition curated by Susan Sherrick that focuses on the artists who have mastered the art of photographing science, space and technology: Berenice Abbott, Man Ray, Laszlo Moholy Nagy, Eadweard Muybridge, Trevor Paglen, Thomas Ruff, Thomas Struth, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Kerry Tribe and Christopher Williams.

In 1939 while Berenice Abbott was living and working in New York City she wrote on the subject of science and technology in photography. However it wasn't until the late 1950s while at MIT creating a new body of work that she was able to achieve and put to words the backbone of this exhibition: " We live in a world made by science, but we, the millions of laymen - do not understand or appreciate the knowledge which controls daily life. To obtain wide popular support for science, to that end that we must explore this vast subject even further and bring as yet unexplored areas under control, there needs to be a friendly interpreter between science and the layman. I believe that photography can be this spokesman, as no other form of expression can be; for photography, the art of our time, the mechanical, scientific medium which matches the pace and character of our era, is attuned to the function. There is an essential unity between photography, science’s child, and science, the parent."

Man Ray made his "rayographs" without a camera by placing objects directly on a sheet of photosensitized paper and exposing it to light. He had photographed everyday objects before, but these unique, visionary images immediately put the photographer on par with the avant-garde painters of the day. Hovering between the abstract and the representational, the rayographs revealed a new way of seeing that delighted the Dadaist poets who championed his work, and that pointed the way to the dreamlike visions of the Surrealist writers and painters who followed.

Laszló Moholy Nagy was highly influenced by constructivism and a strong advocate of the integration of technology and industry into the arts. His interest in qualities of space, time, and light endured throughout his career and transcended the very different media he employed. Whether he was painting or creating "photograms" or crafting sculptures made of transparent Plexiglass, he was ultimately interested in studying how all these basic elements interact. His preoccupation with the phenomenon of light was a defining influence on every period of his work, and one of his great strengths lay in his effortless skill in translating light and spatial dimensions from one medium to another. By the time the first color photographic processes became widely available in the early 1930s, he had mastered black-and-white, and he turned immediately to this next big thing. Color proved to be one of his most important mediums, not only during his early years in Germany, but also as he reestablished himself at the New Bauhaus and the Institute of Design, both of which he initiated upon moving to the United States and settling in Chicago. Until now, with only a few exceptions, his work in color has been unknown.

Eadweard Muybridge is known for his pioneering work on animal locomotion in which he used multiple cameras to capture motion in stop-motion photographs, and his zoopraxiscope, a device for projecting motion pictures that pre-dated the flexible perforated film strip used in cinematography. In the 1880s, while making work at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, he produced over 100,000 images of animals and humans in motion and was able to capture what the human eye could not distinguish as separate movements.

Trevor Paglen’s bucolic Fiber Optic Cable Landing Site, Keawaula, Hawaii is one image from his series of NSA-tapped telecommunications cable “choke points.” The seemingly benign looking seascapes depict some of the NSA’s most controversial surveillance activities. “Choke points are places where clusters of fiber optic cables connect the continents to each other. These cables come on shore in several places connecting the US with Europe. These points hold the interest of the NSA because they are information gold mines.”

Thomas Ruff’s press++ features large-scale photographs of archival media clippings from American newspapers that relate to the theme of space exploration. Ruff scanned the front and back of the original documents, which he has been collecting over several years, and combined the two sides in Adobe Photoshop. Interested equally in the subject matter (and any touch-ups) on the front of the paper and the words, stamps, signatures, and smudges on the back, he thus created seamless montages of image and text, in the process compromising the integrity of the former as well as adding relevant context.

Cassini 23 is based on photographic captures of Saturn taken by NASA's Cassini-Huygens Spacecraft, which launched in 2004 and completed its initial four-year mission in June 2008. Ruff acquired these black and white raw images from NASA's website, where they were broadcast directly from the spacecraft and made available for public download. Through computer manipulation, Ruff infused each gray-scale image with saturated color.

Thomas Struth’s Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System, JSC, Houston 
is one of his many images that penetrates the key places of human imagination in order to scrutinize the landscape of enterprise, invention and digital engineering as well as the complex hidden structures of advanced technology---the image records the structural intricacy of remote techno-industrial and scientific research spaces. It reveals a fascinating critical scrutiny of the high ambitions in which the promises of scientific advancement entangle us.

Hiroshi Sugimoto uses a Van De Graaff 400,000-volt generator to apply an electrical charge directly onto film. The result in each case is a unique, instantaneous image of an electrical current, sometimes resembling a meteor shower, or a “treeing effect” on  the film. William Henry Fox Talbot, was the father of calotype. His momentous discovery of the photosensitive properties of silver alloys led to the development of positive-negative photographic imaging. The idea of observing the effects of electrical discharges on photographic dry plates reflects Sugimoto’s desire to re-create the major discoveries of these scientific pioneers in the darkroom and verify them with his own eyes.

Kerry Tribe’s Parnassius mnemosyne is a butterfly wing as seen under a microscope. In Greek mythology Mnemosyne’ refers to the personification of memory. Author Vladimir Nabokov, also a renowned lepidopterist, included his drawing of Parnassius mnemosyne in his autobiography, "Speak, Memory". The memoir is known for having been published in a string of ever-changing iterations, reflecting the instability of subjectivity and recall.

Christopher Williams’s work addresses the sociopolitical history of the medium within the context of image making. Considering our contemporary, consumer-driven society, Williams’ photographs evoke a subtle shift in our perception by questioning the communication mechanisms and aesthetic conventions that influence our understanding of reality.

UNIT 5 will be open during normal gallery hours of 11- 5 Tuesday – Saturday or 
by appointment. For more details please contact Susan Sherrick at (323) 938 5822.

UNIT 5 is an exhibition space shared by 1301PE and PRAZ-DELAVALLADE

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Nov
8
3:00 PM15:00

BLAKE RAYNE: BURN IT CLEAN

Burn It Clean

17 November 2018 – 12 January 2019

Opening: Saturday, 17 November  6 - 8 pm


Carver Audain

Ralph Fasanella

Jacqueline Humphries

Blake Rayne

Georgia Sagri

Peter Schoolwerth

Cheyney Thompson

Kyle Thurman



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FIONA BANNER & SUPERFLEX
Sep
22
to Oct 6

FIONA BANNER & SUPERFLEX

 
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FIONA BANNER

SUPERFLEX

22 September – 6 October 2018

1301PE is pleased to announce the opening exhibition of two works touching on the idea of hubris at UNIT 5 (the former Marc Foxx space) at 6150 Wilshire Blvd.

In a time when the negative impact of human behavior is staring us in the face, our hubris blinds us from the consequences.

Fiona Banner’s “Black Bunting”

SUPERFLEX’S “Experience Climate Change”

Fiona Banner was born in 1966 and came to prominence in the 1990s with her ‘wordscapes’, epic transcriptions of iconic films retold in the artist’s stream-of consciousness writing. Banner lives and works in London, where she also runs her own imprint The Vanity Press. She is represented in major collections including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Philadelphia Museum of Art; and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. In 2002, Banner was short-listed for the Turner Prize at Tate Britain. Her work has been the subject of solo exhibitions and commissions at Museum De Pont, Tilburg, Netherlands; Tate Britain, London; Whitechapel Gallery, London; The Power Plant, Toronto; Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, United Kingdom; and IKON, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

Founded in Copenhagen in 1993 by Jakob Fenger, Rasmus Nielsen and Bjørnstjerne Christiansen, SUPERFLEX creates “tools” that invite people to participate and communicate in the development of experimental models. In 2017 SUPERFLEX was the recipient of the Hyundai Commission, for which they presented their installation One Two Three Swing! in the Turbine Hall at the Tate Modern, London. Museum solo exhibitions and projects have included: Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; The Hayward Gallery, London; 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan; Perez Art Museum, Miami; Fundación Jumex, Mexico City; Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen; Sharjah Biennial, UAE; and the Venice Biennale.

UNIT 5 will be open during normal gallery hours of 11- 5 Tuesday – Saturday or by appointment. For more details please contact Susan Sherrick at (323) 938 5822.

UNIT 5 is an exhibition space shared by 1301PE and PRAZ-DELAVALLADE

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FIONA CONNOR: DIRECT ADDRESS
Sep
12
to Oct 27

FIONA CONNOR: DIRECT ADDRESS

FIONA CONNOR

Direct Address

12 September – 27 October, 2018

1301PE is pleased to present Direct Address, its fourth exhibition with Fiona Connor. Connor will exhibit her latest body of work Monochromes.

Monochromes are resin casts of architectural surfaces found in public spaces that are each used as a community notice board. In some cases these surfaces were intended to be used as bulletin boards, while often they are windows or doors that have been boarded up with plywood and then co-opted for this use. The five monochromatic works in the 1301PE show have been cast from specific locations in Los Angeles.

The casts of five public notice boards will form an index of the real sites, compressing into one unified body the accumulated dents, weathering, paint, staples, and fragments of flyers that remain. Through the casting process, these multiple dimensions of the board are reconstituted in a single material through one process.  They are then painted in the color matching the original site. The multiplicity of the functioning notice board is transformed into a monochrome, unifying multiple contradictory actions, appeals, and entities.

The ephemera that accumulates on public notice boards represents a commons, a self-organizing democratic space. The cycle unfolds in time, as flyers go up and come down. There is a tension between the bottom-up gesture of people posting a request or an offer, making an announcement, and the top-down process of “cleaning up” these notice boards, through regular maintenance and renewal. The notice board bears traces of this dynamic, in one unified field, where these contradictory movements are encapsulated in one object. It pulls in multiple directions, towards expression, towards silence.

Fiona Connor was born in Auckland, New Zealand, 1981. She lives and works in Los Angeles. Connor was included in the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial and in the first Los Angeles biennial, Made in L.A. 2012 at the Hammer Museum. Her solo exhibitions include Closed Down Clubs, MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Mackey Apartments; Object Classrooms, Govett Brewster Art Gallery; Wallworks at Monash University in Melbourne, Murals and Print (the inaugural exhibition at Various Small Fires), Los Angeles. Recent museum group exhibitions include: Office of Unspecified Services (O.U.S.), Salt Galata, Istanbul, Turkey; Stories of Almost Everyone, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; TL;DR at ARTSPACE, Auckland, New Zealand; Gap, Mark, Sever and Return, Human Resources, Los Angeles; Experimental Impulse, REDCAT, Los Angeles; and Octopus 8, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, Australia. In 2010 she was a finalist for New Zealand’s most prestigious contemporary art award, the Walters Prize.

For more information please contact Susan Sherrick or Brian Butler at 323.938.5822

 

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JACK GOLDSTEIN: UNDER WATER SEA FANTASY
Jun
28
to Aug 18

JACK GOLDSTEIN: UNDER WATER SEA FANTASY

JACK GOLDSTEIN

Under Water Sea Fantasy

28 June – 18 August, 2018                          

1301PE is pleased to present its fourth exhibition with the late Jack Goldstein. The show includes Goldstein’s significant film Under Water Sea Fantasy along with nine silkscreened text and color photographs: Portfolio of Performance, and James Welling’s Jack Goldstein’s studio.

A central figure of the “Pictures Generation”, Goldstein’s work included film, performance, writing, text, painting, sound, and sculpture. Under Water Sea Fantasy began production in 1983 and was completed before his untimely death in 2003. His film reveals Goldstein’s acute understanding of the perception of spectacle and the power of image. Using production values influenced by Hollywood studio techniques, he exploits the spectacular effects of visual presence and the interplay of sound and image. Footage of natural phenomena such as underwater life, volcanic eruptions and celestial events is montaged into a flow of appearing and disappearing energies with no clear narrative structure. At once serene and violent, the seductive visual impact of this film is mesmerizing. Underwater Sea Fantasy premiered in the 2004 Whitney Biennial.

Goldstein’s Portfolio of Performance documents and describes in exacting detail nine of his proposed art performances from 1976 - 1985: The Jump, Sound Performance, Two Boxers, Two Fencers, Records, The Murder, Fire/Body/Light, Body Contortionist and Burning Window. These performances are cinematic in nature and parallel his film work from this period. They remove the artist centric nature of performances. The portfolio serves almost as a set of instructions for additional stagings or interpretations of the original performances, essentially rendering the artist unnecessary to the process.  

James Welling’s Jack Goldstein’s Studio is a series of images that Welling shot of Goldstein and his studio in February 1977, when they both rented offices at the 506 Pacific Building on the corner of Santa Monica Boulevard and Fifth Street. Goldstein was working in restaurants to finance his film "Bone China” and lived in several offices within the building. Welling’s photographs document Jack’s sparse studio that included: a mattress, hangers, some cigarettes, photographs, 2 x 4’s and his body of work: Auphorisms, that are taped to the wall. Welling says: “For the portrait of Jack I used a very slow film, Polaroid type 55, ASA 25. The viewer can see his cigarette burning down itself as he remains motionless for the 30-second exposure.” Welling’s photographs prove to be significant, as they reveal a timeline of Goldstein’s thought process in imagery and content; photos of scuba divers, astronauts, depictions of natural phenomena, as well as text all already exist in 1977 at the time of Welling’s documentation, and will ultimately emerge in Goldstein’s future paintings.

Jack Goldstein’s (1945 – 2003) major solo and group exhibitions include: Gwangju Biennale, 2014; La Biennale di Venezia, 2011; Whitney Biennial, 1985; documenta 8, 1985 and documenta 7, 1982; The Jewish Museum, New York, 2013; Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, 2012; MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, 2009; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2002; Magasin, Centre National d'Art Contemporain, Grenoble, 2002; Künstlerhaus, Stuttgart, 1999; The Power Plant, Toronto, 1991; Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, 1988; Städtische Galerie Erlangen, 1985 and The Kitchen, New York, 1977, 1978 and 1980. His work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California, Musee d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), Barcelona, Spain, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York New York, The Tate Modern, London, United Kingdom, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, Canada and The Broad, Los Angeles, California.

James Welling’s major solo exhibitions include: Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent (S.M.A.K), 2017; Art Institute of Chicago, 2014; Fotomuseum Winterthur, Switzerland and Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, 2013; Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut, 2012; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, 1998. In 2000, the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio organized a major survey of his work, which traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the Baltimore Museum of Art. In 1990, the artist's first museum exhibition was presented by Kunsthalle Bern.

For more information please contact Susan Sherrick or Brian Butler 323.938.5822  

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CAMERON PLATTER: TEEN NON_FICTION
May
19
to Jun 16

CAMERON PLATTER: TEEN NON_FICTION

Cameron Platter

Teen Non_Fiction

19 May – 9 June 2018                          

1301PE is pleased to announce Teen Non_Fiction, an exhibition of new works by South African-based artist, Cameron Platter.  This will be his first exhibition with the gallery. This exhibition presents an installation of new charcoal drawings, pencil drawings, and bronze sculpture.

Incorporating aspects of sculpture, drawing, video, collage, poetry, tapestry, and web, Cameron Platter’s work appropriates and filters, in a highly personal and idiosyncratic way, the enormous volume of information available today.  Blurring the distinction between high and low, his eclectic and multi-disciplinary approach to art making, typically draws from sources as disparate as fast food, art history, photography, psychedelics, landscape, advertising, therapy, collage, and consumerism.

Platter’s drawings in particular step back and forth over the line between abstraction and figuration punctuated by outbursts of pop culture references and inner repression.  In this series of drawings titled “Teen Non_Fiction”, he explores the different connotations, high and low, that fall under the arrangement of those words.

Cameron Platter was born in 1978 in Johannesburg, South Africa.  He graduated with a BFA in painting from the Michaelis School of Fine Art at the University of Cape Town in 2001.  Recent exhibitions include Salami at GNYP Gallery, Berlin (2018); SCREAMING HALLELUJAH at Ever Gold (Projects) (2017); U-SAVED_ME at Depart Foundation, Los Angeles, (2016); 2015 Artist in Residence at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA); Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa, SFMOMA, San Francisco (2014); Imaginary Fact, Contemporary South African Art and the Archive at the 55th Venice Biennale (2013); De Leur Temps at Musee des Beaux-arts de Nantes (2013); Impressions from South Africa, 1965 to Now at MoMA, New York (2011); Les Rencontres Internationales at Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2014) and The Centre Georges Pomidou, Paris (2010); Le Biennale de Dakar 2010, Dakar Senegal; Coca-Colonized at Marte Museum, El Salvador (2010); and Absent Heroes at Iziko South African National Gallery (2010).

His work appears in the permanent collection of MoMA, New York; FRAC Pays de la Loire, France; Iziko South African National Gallery; The Margulies Collection, the Zeitz Collection, and the New Church Collection.  His work has been featured in The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal, Vice Magazine, NKA Journal of Contemporary African Art, The BBC, Utflukt, Art South Africa, Protocollum, and Artforum.  He lives and works in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa.

                       

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KERRY TRIBE: STANDARDIZED PATIENT
Mar
24
to May 5

KERRY TRIBE: STANDARDIZED PATIENT

KERRY TRIBE

Standardized Patient

24 March - 19 May 2018
Opening: 24 March  6 - 8 pm

 

1301 is please to announce Standardized Patient, an exhibition of new work by Los Angeles-based artist and filmmaker Kerry Tribe.  This will be her third exhibition at the gallery.

Commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SF MoMA) in 2017, Standardized Patient offers insight into the work of Standardized Patients or "SPs," professional actors trained to portray medical patients in simulated clinical encounters.  When working with medical students, SPs remain in character and manifest specific symptoms while simultaneously evaluating their doctors-in-training for constructive feedback and grading.  Developed in close collaboration with professional clinicians, communcation experts and SPs working at Stanford Medical School and the University of Southern California, Standardized Patient continues Tribe's ongoing inquiry into the life sciences and medicine while raising questions around performance, communication, and empathy.  As with earlier works like H.M., 2009, and Aphasia Poetry Club, 2015, the internal structures of its narrative development and the physical conditions of its installation mirror the social and cognitive conditions of its subjects.  The installation's central projection screen presents a progression of medical students meeting with their SPs on one side, while, on the other, a synchronized montage of supporting materials offering glimpses of the scripts, snapshots and diagnostic flow charts that inform each party's perspective.

1301PE's ground floor features a second video installation, = , 2017.  Playing on a large flat screen monitor mounted to the ceiling, = consists entirely of aerial shots of the Los Angeles River captured during the production of Tribe's 2016 film Exquisite Corpse.  Viewers look straight up at the footage that was shot looking straight down, resulting in a disorienting inversion.  = is the latest in a series of works that occupy an ongoin, more abstract tendency in Tribe's oeuvre in which nature and natural phenomena are described through technically mediated, highly restrained filmic forms.

Tribe has had solo exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco (SF MoMA); Parque Galeria, Mexico City' 356 Mission Rd., Los Angeles; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; Carpenter Center, Cambridge; and the Contemporary Art Center, Irvine.  She has staged performances at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco and the TATE Modern.  In 2017 she received an Herb Alpert Award in Film and Video, a California Community Foundation Fellowship in 2015, an Artadia Award in 2013, and both a USA Artist Fellowship and Creative Capital Grant in 2012.  In 2016 the City of Los Angeles awarded Tribe a public commission to produce Exquisite Corpse, a film about the Los Angeles River, which will screen nightly on the Hight Line in New York, Summer 2018.

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SUPERFLEX: WHATEVER WORKS
Jan
19
to Mar 3

SUPERFLEX: WHATEVER WORKS

SUPERFLEX_POSTER_final.jpg

SUPERFLEX

Whatever Works

19 January - 10 March 2018
Opening: 19 January  6 - 8 pm

SUPERFLEX and Daniel McClean in Conversation: Saturday, January 20th  3 pm

1301PE is pleased to announce it’s fifth exhibition with Danish artist’ group SUPERFLEX entitled Whatever Works.

Founded in Copenhagen in 1993 by Jakob Fenger, Rasmus Nielsen and Bjornstjerne Christiansen, SUPERFLEX created “tools” to invite people to participate and communicate in the development of experimental models. Works like Superchannel, Biogas Superkilen, Hospital Equipment and One Two Three Swing! propose solutions to real problems, such as sourcing and delivering necessary surgical equipment to hospitals in conflict areas, developing local and efficient alternative fuel sources or creating a common space for community discourse can occur.

Whatever Works surveys a series of ideas central to the world of SUPERFLEX. It commences with The Campaign, a billboard that was produced in 1994 around a series of meetings with different companies regarding a secret project sealed in orange pvc; SUPERFLEX on canvas, 1995, an orange painting inspired by International Klein Blue; Copy Right, 2007, a series of photographs of a misappropriated replica of Arne Jacobson’s Ant Chair which has been corrected; and concludes with their most recent works If Value Than Copy, Euphoria Now and ALL DATA TO THE PEOPLE.

In our current climate where movements, transactions and relations are constantly registered and analyzed the access to data is equal to power. ALL DATA TO THE PEOPLE, a hand-painted mural that can be translated into any language, points out the asymmetry in the access to data, the right to information and distribution of power we are experiencing, and how the value of data is concentrated to very few commercial and state players. We are who we are registered as.

First conceived as a slogan for the work Copy shop 2005, If Value Than Copy, now takes shape as a transforming black and white work on canvas. Each edition in the series is unique and shows an increasingly distorted version of the design in a chronological order. The first edition featuring the original design is hand-painted with the following editions being printed to represent the nature of the analogue photocopy machine, originally bought and used in the first COPYSHOP in Copenhagen.

The Hong Kong Dollar is from their ongoing series Euphoria Now based on color schemes of global currencies. The conceptual starting point for these paintings was the discovery of a so-called ‘dream machine’ from the 1970’s. By directly referring to the colors of currencies, SUPERFLEX transferred the concept of the dream machine into contemporary society’s greatest hypnagogic hallucination of all: money. The first painting was conceived in 2015 with the seven colors of the euro note, and currently exists in 19 different currencies and economies including the: Swiss Franc, Japanese Yen, and the Cook Islands.

In 2017 SUPERFLEX was the recipient of the Hyundai Commission, One Two Three Swing!, in the Turbine Hall at the Tate Modern, London. Museum solo exhibitions have included: Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, California; The Hayward Gallery, London, United Kingdom; 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan; Perez Art Museum, Miami, Florida; Fundación Jumex, Mexico City, Mexico; and Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark ; Sharjah Biennial, UAE and the Venice Biennale.

 

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CHRISTOPHER MICHLIG & JAN TUMLIR: SOME LIKE IT COLD
Sep
30
to Oct 28

CHRISTOPHER MICHLIG & JAN TUMLIR: SOME LIKE IT COLD

CHRISTOPHER MICHLIG & JAN TUMLIR

Some Like it Cold

30 September – 28 October 2017

In 1965, shortly after the release of his influential book Understanding Media, Marshall McLuhan was approached by the publisher Jerome Agel with this challenge: “Do you believe that a children’s book could be developed from Understanding Media?” The outcome, which appeared in 1967, is the profusely illustrated The Medium Is the Massage, an audacious experiment in the conveyance of difficult thought via innovative art direction and layout. Produced in close collaboration with the designer Quentin Fiore, McLuhan’s core ideas are here distilled into a series of compelling sound-bites, which are then juxtaposed with a range of pictorial material, much of it culled from the pages of the daily papers and magazines. Throughout it, typography turns pictographic. If the first book already reads as a kind of final communiqué from the “Gutenberg Galaxy,” as McLuhan dubbed the media order that was set into place with the invention of movable type and the printing press in the mid-fifteenth century, then its sequel pushes insistently toward the next stage, rethinking the form of the book on the whole as a device of visual literacy.

The Medium Is the Massage is the point of departure for SOME LIKE IT COLD, a suite of 63 street posters produced by Jan Tumlir and Christopher Michlig. Those words of McLuhan’s most prone to “jump off the page” of the book were sent to Tribune Showprint, a commercial poster printing shop founded in Indiana in 1878, to reformat in letterpress type-blocks atop grounds of silkscreened color in any way they saw fit. Thereafter, several more layers of information were added by Tumlir and Michlig to the results they received back in the mail. Some of these additions reinforce McLuhan’s original thoughts, and some undermine them. Basically, SOME LIKE IT COLD is an attempt to answer to The Medium Is the Massage across the divide of a half-century.

The Medium Is the Massage turned fifty years old this year, which lends a certain formal urgency to this re-visitation. In regard to the evolution of media technology fifty years is a very long time, several lifetimes. But what of the children that were initially envisioned as the first responders to McLuhan’s book, now drifting toward their silver years? Is any of the optimism inherent in that account of a dawning “communication age” salvageable here and now? And what, more generally, are we to make of our massaging by media in this post-idealistic and paradoxical stage of disaster capitalism? As it happens, the word “massage” was introduced as a printing error into the title of a book that would otherwise have straightforwardly reproduced McLuhan’s dictum, “the medium is the message.” Enthusiastically ratified by its author – “Leave it alone!” he reportedly exclaimed at the time; “It’s great, and right on target!” – this inadvertent substitution of a single letter completes the thought that there are in fact no discrete messages in media, just as there are no discrete mediums. “The ‘content’ of any medium,” McLuhan would later claim, “is always another medium.” The works in SOME LIKE IT COLD follow from this still relevant insight, poised on the fulcrum of the “mass-age” and the “mess-age.”

For more information please contact Susan Sherrick or Brian Butler at 323.938.5822

 
Jan Tumlir and former SCI-Arc faculty member Christopher Michlig break down their recent exhibition at 1301PE Gallery, "Some Like It Cold" - a somber and yet irreverent meditation on the form of the street poster in the age of digitally integrated media. Jan Tumlir is an art-writer, teacher and curator who lives in Los Angeles.
 
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LIFES A RIOT AT 25
Apr
29
to Jul 24

LIFES A RIOT AT 25

Life’s a riot at 25 celebrates 1301PE’s storied history through ephemera over the past 25 years. When 1301 was founded in 1992 the artist poster was central to the overall thinking of the gallery. Within this format the artist was free to extend the exhibition through ephemera.

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UTA BARTH
Mar
11
to Apr 22

UTA BARTH

1301PE is pleased to present the newest exhibition by MacArthur Fellow Uta Barth, on view from March 11 to April 22, 2017. Her third solo exhibition with the gallery will consist of two distinct yet related projects: “In the Light and Shadow of Morandi” and “Untitled 2017.” Both projects are continuations of a career long engagement with and exploration of visual perception.

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JAN ALBERS: FLOTATION
Nov
11
to Dec 20

JAN ALBERS: FLOTATION

Albers belongs to a young generation of conceptual artists who develop their work beyond the periodically supposed end of painting and is widely considered as one of the central positions of abstract contemporary art. Following Albers' critically acclaimed solo exhibitions at the Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven and the Von Der Heydt-Museum Wuppertal in Germany, this exhibition presents new wedge pieces, 'chainsaw massacres,' as well as his hydraulically pressed automobile pieces.

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